Tag Archives: Book Reviews

London Stories: A Little Place Off the Edgware Road by Graham Greene

This is a very short review! I read Graham Greene’s The End of the Affair awhile back. I liked his writing, but the plot not so much – I was put off by the long talks of God – which pained me at the time because I was hoping Greene would be a good pick […]

Troubles by J. G. Farrell

Major Brendan Archer meets Angela one afternoon in 1916 while he was on home leave. When letters come pouring for him to the trenches, signed ‘Your loving fiancee, Angela,’ it seems like Brendan may have acquired himself a fiancee without having any recollection of it. So after the war ends in 1919, Brendan goes to […]

A Forsyte Encounters the People, 1917 by John Galsworthy

A Forsyte Encounters the People, 1917 is from John Galsworthy’s novel On Forsyte ‘Change. Galsworthy who won the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1932 wrote a number of books on the Forsyte family. Even though On Forsyte ‘Change is not a part of The Forsyte Saga, it looks into the lives of older Forsytes before the […]

Dunbar by Edward St. Aubyn

Hogarth Shakespeare’s latest novel, Dunbar is Edward St. Aubyn’s take on the Bard of Avon’s famous tragedy King Lear. I wasn’t familiar with King Lear story, but I didn’t buy the original play like last time because I assumed Dunbar will contain a summarized account of King Lear. However, it didn’t, and I had to […]

London Stories: The Elephant Man by Frederick Treves

I think most of you would be familiar with the story of Joseph Merrick thanks to the 1980 movie, The Elephant Man. I haven’t watched the movie, but I had a vague idea of who Joseph Merrick was before reading Dr. Frederick Treves first-hand account from the book, The Elephant Man and Other Reminiscences. For […]

Young Once by Patrick Modiano

In 2014 Patrick Modiano who is called “Marcel Proust of our time” won the Nobel Prize in Literature “for the art of memory with which he has evoked the most ungraspable human destinies and uncovered the life-world of the Occupation.” He was a well-known writer in France at the time, but he was not popular […]

London Stories: The Fetching of Susan by Alfred Walter Barrett

The Fetching of Susan is probably the most unusual short story I read this year. Written by Alfred Walter Barrett in 1912, the story chronicles London suburban life. I couldn’t find much information about Barrett on the internet. He seems to be an enigma – The Fetching of Susan is from Neighbours of Mine, which […]

The Fires of Autumn by Irène Némirovsky

In 1914 when WWI is declared, Bernard Jacquelain is only a young boy of seventeen. He is full of patriotism, and in the naive belief that the war would end in three months he voluntarily joins the war to fight for the honor of France. But three months turn into four years, and when Bernard […]

London Stories: Christopherson by George Gissing

Christopherson, written in 1902 is a short story in George Gissing’s collection The House of Cobwebs and Other Stories. For George Orwell, Gissing was “perhaps the best novelist England has produced.” This was my first time reading Gissing’s work, and I think Orwell might have been onto something – Gissing is a fantastic storyteller! 🙂 […]

The Judges of the Secret Court by David Stacton

In 1963, two years after David Stacton published The Judges of the Secret Court, Time magazine named him one of “the best American novelists of the preceding decade.” Alongside Stacton in the list were big-league literary giants like Joseph Heller, John Updike, and Philip Roth. However, Stacton was not a well-known writer in his time – his historical novels didn’t make […]