Tag Archives: Booker Prize

Night Boat to Tangier by Kevin Barry

In Night Boat to Tangier, we have two aging Irishmen waiting at the Algeciras ferry terminal in Spain. Maurice Hearne and Charlie Redmond have a long history together – over the last few decades they have been friends, business partners, rivals, and roommates in a mental institution. The drug smuggling business that they started when […]

Ending Up by Kingsley Amis

This book grew on me! With everything that has been happening in the US, I needed a quick, witty read, which is why I turned to Kingsley Amis as many have told me he is a master of comedy. However, when I was done reading Ending Up roughly a week ago, I felt a bit […]

The Water Cure by Sophie Mackintosh

I couldn’t make much sense of this book! In The Water Cure, which is billed as a feminist dystopia, we have three sisters, Grace, Lia and Sky, living on an island with their parents isolated from the rest of the world. The world, according to King, their father, and their nameless mother, is a toxic […]

Lost Children Archive by Valeria Luiselli

A refugee is someone who has already arrived somewhere, in a foreign land, but must wait for an indefinite time before actually, fully having arrived. Refugees wait in detention centers, shelters, or camps; in federal custody and under the gaze of armed officials. They wait in long lines for lunch, for a bed to sleep […]

My Sister, the Serial Killer by Oyinkan Braithwaite

My Sister, the Serial Killer, set in Lagos, Nigeria, is one of the most compelling and fast-paced reads among the Women’s Prize for Fiction shortlisted novels in 2019. I managed to devour it in a single setting, and it has a simple premise. Ayoola, Korede’s little sister, is everything Korede is not. She is a […]

Warlight by Michael Ondaatje

Warlight begins in 1945, after WWII had ended, as Nathaniel’s parents are getting ready to move across the world for work. The fourteen-year-old Nathaniel and his elder sister, Rachel, aren’t invited to accompany them on this voyage – instead, they are expected to stay behind in England and continue their education under the watchful eyes […]

Milkman by Anna Burns

At the time, age eighteen, having been brought up in a hair-trigger society where the ground rules were – if no physically violent touch was being laid upon you, and no outright verbal insults were being levelled at you, and no taunting looks in the vicinity either, then nothing was happening, so how could you […]

The Long Take by Robin Robertson

This year, for the first time in the Man Booker award history, a book of verse made it to the shortlist. Now I only read VERY little poetry – I can’t even remember the last time I read a poem – because it is usually a struggle for me. More often than not, I end […]

Everything Under by Daisy Johnson

Everything Under, Daisy Johnson’s debut novel made waves when it was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize this year. At 27, Daisy is the youngest ever writer to be shortlisted for the award (previously it was Eleanor Catton, who went to win the Man Booker for The Luminaries when she was 28-years-old), and most readers […]

Home Fire by Kamila Shamsie

Home Fire is written by Kamila Shamsie who is no stranger to the Women’s Prize for Fiction. She has been shortlisted for the prize twice in the past, and her latest novel which is among the longlisted books this year is very appropriate for the times we live in. Shamsie’s novel, which is a modern […]

Do Not Say We Have Nothing by Madeleine Thien

Do Not Say We Have Nothing is a book that completely surprised me! When I started to work my way through the Women’s Prize for Fiction 2017 shortlist, I kept Do Not Say We Have Nothing for last because the reviews I read about it were mostly negative. One of the recurring complaints by some […]

The Siege of Krishnapur by J. G. Farrell

In 1857, when Chapatis begin to appear mysteriously in the most unexpected of places, only Mr. Hopkins, the Collector for East India Company senses danger. His attempts to warn others fall on deaf ears. Yes, the British made a mistake in handling religious matters in India, but surely the native Indians wouldn’t want to reject […]

Troubles by J. G. Farrell

Major Brendan Archer meets Angela one afternoon in 1916 while he was on home leave. When letters come pouring for him to the trenches, signed ‘Your loving fiancee, Angela,’ it seems like Brendan may have acquired himself a fiancee without having any recollection of it. So after the war ends in 1919, Brendan goes to […]

The Underground Railroad by Colson Whitehead

I am a volunteer at the local library bookstore. It is a second-hand bookshop, and it is very rarely I come home after my shift without a book! Last week I bought a hardcover copy of The Underground Railroad in mint condition for $5! I was not going to read it immediately, but when it […]

The Sea by John Banville

The Sea is a book that genuinely daunted me! Oh boy! I thought I write long sentences! But no, John Banville writes LONGER sentences! He uses gazillion commas and, at one point I swear it made my head spin! 😀 Here is an excerpt to give you a taste: Speaking of the television room, I realize suddenly, […]