Tag Archives: NYRB Classics

Dancing Lessons for the Advanced in Age by Bohumil Hrabal

The novella Dancing Lessons for the Advanced in Age is written as a single (unfinished) sentence! Long sentences that run for pages are not my usual cup of tea. I still remember how daunting it was to read Gabriel García Márquez’s (he is one of my favorite authors) The Autumn Of The Patriarch. And that […]

The Black Spider by Jeremias Gotthelf

The Black Spider written in 1842 is a short novella set in a remote Swiss village. On a summer Sunday, the villagers gather to celebrate a baptism at a lovely farmhouse. During the feast (the child is the firstborn son, so food doesn’t stop coming!), one of the villagers wants to know the story behind […]

The Goshawk by T. H. White

Reading The Goshawk was a first for me. I have read memoirs before, but The Goshawk was the first time I read a memoir about a man’s feral companion(s). T. H. White is known for his Arthurian novels; The Once and Future King. But before he made his mark in the literary world, T. H. […]

The Pilgrim Hawk by Glenway Wescott

The Pilgrim Hawk is a very short novel. It describes the events that take place in a single summer afternoon in the late 1920s at a French chateau. The owner of the house is Alexandra (Alex) Henry, a young American heiress. Her friend, Alwyn Towers, an American expatriate/ novelist is staying with her, served by […]

A View of the Harbour by Elizabeth Taylor

After reading The Sea by John Banville, I feared I might get into a reading slump. Luckily, Elizabeth Taylor saved me with her delightful book – A View of the Harbour written in 1947. ‘He pays me money, as he should and must. A man cannot be allowed to reserve a woman’s beauty for himself until it is gone, and […]

Pitch Dark by Renata Adler

Pitch Dark was a tough read, and I almost put it aside after reading ten pages. The only thing that kept me going is Renata Adler’s eloquent prose – I did not want to and could not miss out on that! At the end, I was glad I did not give up on it too soon. […]