Tag Archives: Women’s Prize for Fiction

My Sister, the Serial Killer by Oyinkan Braithwaite

My Sister, the Serial Killer, set in Lagos, Nigeria, is one of the most compelling and fast-paced reads among the Women’s Prize for Fiction shortlisted novels in 2019. I managed to devour it in a single setting, and it has a simple premise. Ayoola, Korede’s little sister, is everything Korede is not. She is a […]

An American Marriage by Tayari Jones

So I have decided that I’m going to try and read all the Women’s Prize for Fiction shortlisted books before the winner announcement on 5 June. Even though the Women’s Prize for Fiction is one of the awards I follow, I usually take my sweet time reading the shortlist. But this year, since the only […]

Milkman by Anna Burns

At the time, age eighteen, having been brought up in a hair-trigger society where the ground rules were – if no physically violent touch was being laid upon you, and no outright verbal insults were being levelled at you, and no taunting looks in the vicinity either, then nothing was happening, so how could you […]

The Mermaid and Mrs. Hancock by Imogen Hermes Gowar

Had The Mermaid and Mrs. Hancock not been shortlisted for Women’s Prize for Fiction, I don’t think I’d have picked it up. It’s historical fiction, with a dash of romance and fantasy thrown in for good measure. Since the latter is not my jam, I found the notion of reading a 500-page novel featuring mermaids […]

Sight by Jessie Greengrass

In Sight, which was shortlisted for Women’s Prize for Fiction in 2018, the unnamed narrator is a young woman who is expecting her second child. With her husband, Johannes the narrator already has a daughter, however, the decision to have a child had been a difficult one for her at first. The narrator writes how […]

Eleanor Oliphant Is Completely Fine by Gail Honeyman

I don’t know how to describe Eleanor Oliphant Is Completely Fine – I’m at a loss for words. It is such a lovely book, and I don’t think I can do justice to it. But I shall try my best, so bear with me! The novel’s protagonist Eleanor Oliphant is a very interesting woman. She […]

Three Things About Elsie by Joanna Cannon

Three Things About Elsie received rave reviews when it was first published in the UK at the beginning of this year. A lot of readers across the pond wanted to see it in the Women’s Prize for Fiction shortlist, although, unfortunately, it didn’t make it. But in any case, their gushing praises were enough to […]

Circe by Madeline Miller

I’m a big fan of Madeline Miller’s The Song of Achilles, which is so far my favorite out of all the Women’s Prize for Fiction winners. So I was very excited when Miller’s second novel, Circe came out in April. Circe, a goddess of sorcery in Greek mythology, is the daughter of Helios, the solar […]

When I Hit You by Meena Kandasamy

When I Hit You tells the story of an unnamed narrator, a writer who fell in love with a university professor and moved hundreds of miles away from home after marrying him. This man who disguised himself as a progressive individual, in fact, turned out to be a monster – paranoid, controlling, and manipulative – […]

See What I Have Done by Sarah Schmidt

Lizzie Borden took an axe And gave her mother forty whacks. When she saw what she had done, She gave her father forty-one. Sarah Schmidt’s debut See What I Have Done begins on August 4th in 1892 at Fall River, Massachusetts, soon after the body of Andrew Borden, a wealthy manufacturer/ entrepreneur is discovered by […]

Home Fire by Kamila Shamsie

Home Fire is written by Kamila Shamsie who is no stranger to the Women’s Prize for Fiction. She has been shortlisted for the prize twice in the past, and her latest novel which is among the longlisted books this year is very appropriate for the times we live in. Shamsie’s novel, which is a modern […]

The Idiot by Elif Batuman

Elif Batuman’s story is about Selin (a.k.a. The Idiot), a Turkish American who begins her freshman year in Havard in 1995. Selin is a smart kid, but in Havard where everyone is intelligent, she is nothing special. She is also eighteen, which means she doesn’t have concrete plans for her future. So the story follows […]

A Boy in Winter by Rachel Seiffert

Longlisted for Women’s Prize for Fiction A Boy in Winter is set during WWII in a newly occupied small town in Ukraine. SS armies are rounding up Jews when Yankel, a young Jewish boy decides to make a run for it with Momik, his baby brother. Yankel has no clue of the trials that lie […]

Do Not Say We Have Nothing by Madeleine Thien

Do Not Say We Have Nothing is a book that completely surprised me! When I started to work my way through the Women’s Prize for Fiction 2017 shortlist, I kept Do Not Say We Have Nothing for last because the reviews I read about it were mostly negative. One of the recurring complaints by some […]

First Love by Gwendoline Riley

Neve, a writer in her mid-thirties lives in London with her husband Edwyn, an older man. Thier marriage seems to be blissful at first. They are affectionate with each other, have cute pet names! But soon Gwendoline Riley shatters any illusions we might have had about their marriage by showing us the toxic side of […]